Calendar

Dec
11
Fri
13 Days of Delta, “Family Game Night” @ TImeless Events
Dec 11 @ 6:13 pm – 8:13 pm

gametime

“Family Game Night”

Timeless Events

2710 Milledgeville Road, Augusta, GA, 30904

Collection Items:

Family Board Games (Puzzles, craft items, & etc.)

Hosts: Doris Pearson, Angel LIttle, Maggie Hill, Pat Brown,

Kesha Chivers, Deborah Coleman, Karan Abron

Dec
12
Sat
13 Days of Delta, World AIDS Day Walk + December Social @ Thankful Baptist Fellowship Hall
Dec 12 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

HOLIDAY-PARTY

World AIDS Day Walk 

Saturday December 12, 2015

Paine College

Warm-Ups Begin At 9:15 am – Walks Starts At 10 am

Attire: Delta Paraphernalia

December Social

302 Walker Street, Augusta, GA, 30901

Attire: Delta Dressy

Collection Items:

$10 Gift Cards for teens in foster care

Dec
13
Sun
13 Days of Delta, Sunday Fellowship @ Sharon Baptist Church
Dec 13 @ 10:30 am – 12:30 pm

HOLIDAY-PARTY

Sunday Fellowship

Sharon Baptist Church

3434 Sharon Road, Augusta, GA, 30909

Attire: Delta Red

Dec
14
Mon
13 Days of Delta, Safe Homes Donation Presentation @ Safe Homes of Augusta, Inc.
Dec 14 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm

hands holding gift

Safe Homes Donation Presentation

Safe Homes of Augusta, Inc.

904 Merry St, Augusta, GA 30904

Bring All Donated Items

Feb
1
Mon
National Black History Month
Feb 1 – Feb 29 all-day

aa_hist_2010

As a Harvard-trained historian, Carter G. Woodson, like W. E. B. Du Bois before him, believed that truth could not be denied and that reason would prevail over prejudice. His hopes to raise awareness of African American’s contributions to civilization was realized when he and the organization he founded, the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASNLH), conceived and announced Negro History Week in 1925. The event was first celebrated during a week in February 1926 that encompassed the birthdays of both Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. The response was overwhelming: Black history clubs sprang up; teachers demanded materials to instruct their pupils; and progressive whites, not simply white scholars and philanthropists, stepped forward to endorse the effort.

By the time of Woodson’s death in 1950, Negro History Week had become a central part of African American life and substantial progress had been made in bringing more Americans to appreciate the celebration. At mid–century, mayors of cities nationwide issued proclamations noting Negro History Week. The Black Awakening of the 1960s dramatically expanded the consciousness of African Americans about the importance of black history, and the Civil Rights movement focused Americans of all color on the subject of the contributions of African Americans to our history and culture.

The celebration was expanded to a month in 1976, the nation’s bicentennial. President Gerald R. Ford urged Americans to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.” That year, fifty years after the first celebration, the association held the first African American History Month. By this time, the entire nation had come to recognize the importance of Black history in the drama of the American story. Since then each American president has issued African American History Month proclamations. And the association—now the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH)—continues to promote the study of Black history all year.

(Excerpt from an essay by Daryl Michael Scott, Howard University, for the Association for the Study of African American Life and History)

For more information visit http://www.africanamericanhistorymonth.gov/about.html.

The Augusta Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. does not endorse any of the businesses listed on this website.

Feb
1
Wed
National Black History Month
Feb 1 – Mar 1 all-day

aa_hist_2010

As a Harvard-trained historian, Carter G. Woodson, like W. E. B. Du Bois before him, believed that truth could not be denied and that reason would prevail over prejudice. His hopes to raise awareness of African American’s contributions to civilization was realized when he and the organization he founded, the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASNLH), conceived and announced Negro History Week in 1925. The event was first celebrated during a week in February 1926 that encompassed the birthdays of both Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. The response was overwhelming: Black history clubs sprang up; teachers demanded materials to instruct their pupils; and progressive whites, not simply white scholars and philanthropists, stepped forward to endorse the effort.

By the time of Woodson’s death in 1950, Negro History Week had become a central part of African American life and substantial progress had been made in bringing more Americans to appreciate the celebration. At mid–century, mayors of cities nationwide issued proclamations noting Negro History Week. The Black Awakening of the 1960s dramatically expanded the consciousness of African Americans about the importance of black history, and the Civil Rights movement focused Americans of all color on the subject of the contributions of African Americans to our history and culture.

The celebration was expanded to a month in 1976, the nation’s bicentennial. President Gerald R. Ford urged Americans to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.” That year, fifty years after the first celebration, the association held the first African American History Month. By this time, the entire nation had come to recognize the importance of Black history in the drama of the American story. Since then each American president has issued African American History Month proclamations. And the association—now the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH)—continues to promote the study of Black history all year.

(Excerpt from an essay by Daryl Michael Scott, Howard University, for the Association for the Study of African American Life and History)

For more information visit http://www.africanamericanhistorymonth.gov/about.html.

The Augusta Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. does not endorse any of the businesses listed on this website.

Feb
1
Thu
National Black History Month
Feb 1 – Mar 1 all-day

aa_hist_2010

As a Harvard-trained historian, Carter G. Woodson, like W. E. B. Du Bois before him, believed that truth could not be denied and that reason would prevail over prejudice. His hopes to raise awareness of African American’s contributions to civilization was realized when he and the organization he founded, the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASNLH), conceived and announced Negro History Week in 1925. The event was first celebrated during a week in February 1926 that encompassed the birthdays of both Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. The response was overwhelming: Black history clubs sprang up; teachers demanded materials to instruct their pupils; and progressive whites, not simply white scholars and philanthropists, stepped forward to endorse the effort.

By the time of Woodson’s death in 1950, Negro History Week had become a central part of African American life and substantial progress had been made in bringing more Americans to appreciate the celebration. At mid–century, mayors of cities nationwide issued proclamations noting Negro History Week. The Black Awakening of the 1960s dramatically expanded the consciousness of African Americans about the importance of black history, and the Civil Rights movement focused Americans of all color on the subject of the contributions of African Americans to our history and culture.

The celebration was expanded to a month in 1976, the nation’s bicentennial. President Gerald R. Ford urged Americans to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.” That year, fifty years after the first celebration, the association held the first African American History Month. By this time, the entire nation had come to recognize the importance of Black history in the drama of the American story. Since then each American president has issued African American History Month proclamations. And the association—now the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH)—continues to promote the study of Black history all year.

(Excerpt from an essay by Daryl Michael Scott, Howard University, for the Association for the Study of African American Life and History)

For more information visit http://www.africanamericanhistorymonth.gov/about.html.

The Augusta Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. does not endorse any of the businesses listed on this website.

Feb
18
Sun
“Pearls of Power”-Red Carpet Event Movie: BLACK PANTHER in 3D @ Regal Exchange 20 Theater, Auditorium 11
Feb 18 @ 4:15 pm
“Pearls of Power”-Red Carpet Event Movie: BLACK PANTHER in 3D @ Regal Exchange 20 Theater, Auditorium 11 | Augusta | Georgia | United States

You are invited to join us for our Pearls of Power -Red Carpet Event

Movie Feature: BLACK PANTHER

Tickets are on sale now via Regal (ticket booth) or Fandango. Hurry!!!! This show will sell out quickly!

 

Attire: Members see AACWIRE for more details

 

www.dstaugustaalumnae.org

 

 

 

 

The Augusta Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. does not endorse any of the businesses listed on this website.

“Pearls of Power”-Red Carpet Event Movie: BLACK PANTHER in 3D @ Regal Exchange 20 Theater, Auditorium 11
Feb 18 @ 4:15 pm
“Pearls of Power”-Red Carpet Event Movie: BLACK PANTHER in 3D @ Regal Exchange 20 Theater, Auditorium 11 | Augusta | Georgia | United States

You Are invited to join us for our Pearls of Power -Red Carpet Event

Movie Feature: BLACK PANTHER

Tickets are on sale now via Regal (ticket booth) or Fandango. Hurry!!!! This show will sell out quickly!
 
Attire: Members see AACWIRE for more details
www.dstaugustaalumnae.org
The Augusta Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. does not endorse any of the businesses listed on this website.
Feb
1
Fri
National Black History Month
Feb 1 – Mar 1 all-day

aa_hist_2010

As a Harvard-trained historian, Carter G. Woodson, like W. E. B. Du Bois before him, believed that truth could not be denied and that reason would prevail over prejudice. His hopes to raise awareness of African American’s contributions to civilization was realized when he and the organization he founded, the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASNLH), conceived and announced Negro History Week in 1925. The event was first celebrated during a week in February 1926 that encompassed the birthdays of both Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. The response was overwhelming: Black history clubs sprang up; teachers demanded materials to instruct their pupils; and progressive whites, not simply white scholars and philanthropists, stepped forward to endorse the effort.

By the time of Woodson’s death in 1950, Negro History Week had become a central part of African American life and substantial progress had been made in bringing more Americans to appreciate the celebration. At mid–century, mayors of cities nationwide issued proclamations noting Negro History Week. The Black Awakening of the 1960s dramatically expanded the consciousness of African Americans about the importance of black history, and the Civil Rights movement focused Americans of all color on the subject of the contributions of African Americans to our history and culture.

The celebration was expanded to a month in 1976, the nation’s bicentennial. President Gerald R. Ford urged Americans to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.” That year, fifty years after the first celebration, the association held the first African American History Month. By this time, the entire nation had come to recognize the importance of Black history in the drama of the American story. Since then each American president has issued African American History Month proclamations. And the association—now the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH)—continues to promote the study of Black history all year.

(Excerpt from an essay by Daryl Michael Scott, Howard University, for the Association for the Study of African American Life and History)

For more information visit http://www.africanamericanhistorymonth.gov/about.html.

The Augusta Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. does not endorse any of the businesses listed on this website.